Wednesday, January 13, 2021

Move Forward With SMART Goals for 2021

By Suzy Leopold

    With a new beginning many review and reflect on the 2020 year and then move forward into 2021 by making personal and/or career resolutions.

    Did you make resolutions or did you set goals as a new year was ushered in?

    Resolutions can be defined as a promise or a wish to do better. Most often resolutions are made with good intentions, purpose, and determination. However, by February many resolutions are left behind. They become abandoned resolutions.

    Most often goals include tangible objectives and plans for what one intends to accomplish all through determination. Goal setting provides direction to achieve desired outcomes. 

    To be more precise—set SMART goals.

    What are SMART Goals?


    Setting SMART Goals is a concept to achieve results.

    To achieve a successful end result with creativity on your side, consider establishing SMART Goals. 


    They are tangible, specific goals that are measured, possible, and achievable. They are relevant goals to match your needs in a timely fashion.


    Begin by identifying three or four goals. Make sure they meet the elements of a SMART goal. Are they concrete and specific? Can you quantify and measure them? Can you achieve them realistically? Are the goals relevant to your ultimate goal? Adjust as need be to make the dreams and desires come true. Set the bar higher if you discover the SMART goals you set are not challenging you. Fine tune and recalibrate goals if they are not practical. Consider long-term and short-term goals.


    Examine these SMART Goal examples and non examples.

Can you identify which ones will achieve the best results for success? 

An estimated 188.9 million American adults are determine to better themselves in 2021 by:

  • Learning something new 
  • Making lifestyle changes
  • Setting goals

Another interesting fact: 

  • 71 % of Americans are feeling hopeful in 2021.



For additional information:

Ready or Not. It’s Time to Show Up

What Good Writers Do

Writing Goals: 2021

    If you made resolutions or goals for the new year, you may want reconsider. It’s not too late to consider SMART Goals to achieve successful results. SMART Goals can be written as personal or professional goals anytime. Take these ideas and make them your own. SMART Goals are unique to each individual. 

    Celebrate your success along the way as you continue to move forward through the year.

    May you find insight and inspiration for your writing and/or illustrating journey by setting SMART Goals. May your promises to achieve with purpose equal success in 2021.

    Every new year is a time for renewal and a new beginning. Start 2021 off right by reading, writing, and creating with established SMART Goals.

 “You are the key to achieving your goals.

No one else is going to do it for you.

Go find your star and make it shine.”

~Mike Ciccotello, author and illustrator


Wednesday, January 6, 2021

PRODUCTIVITY WITHOUT RESOLUTIONS OR RIGIDITY: You Are Not a Jedi (Apologies to Yoda) by Carol Coven Grannick


Yoda famously told Luke Skywalker, "Try not! Do or do not. There is no try." Expectation of action, rather than thinking about action—not a bad thing. But over the years, I've come to believe in something more flexible for those of us who do not respond well to rigid and global resolutions. And virtually every article on "resolutions" cites 80% failure rate. That tells us a couple of things:


it's not the desires, longings, or plans that are at fault, but the language, and therefore quality, of the resolutions. It also tells us that if we are not Jedi—and even more, not fictional characters in a movie—it is quite possible that 'trying' is a pretty decent thing to do. Because we are human. And rigid and other-worldly expectations often fail us (that's right—I blame the type of expectation, not the human).

But...There's a Lot We Can Do 
 
This does not mean we cannot dream and do. We can. 

But there may be more effective ways to handle our own expectations, hopes and dreams, and plans for ourselves. These suggestions are based on my own life experience, beliefs, and knowledge, and apply to every day of the year, not only the first of January. They have increased my persistence and productivity as a writer, and perhaps they may be helpful to you. 






It's common for me to check in with myself about my needs, longings, passions, plans, and more. I expect to work each day in some way. I enjoy challenges and use new experiences to open and surprise my brain, discovering new creative journeys that often lead back to a better place with a work-in-progress. In these difficult and challenging times, I've called on a strength much more frequently that feeds emotional resilience, and flows from it, as well—flexibility. 

How We Tend to Respond to Restriction 
 
I learned forty years ago that one major external non-creative 'resolution'-related activity, dieting, has an up to 95% failure rate, causing survivors to regain all of the weight they'd lost, and more. As I gently and slowly learned to discover my physiological hunger and feed myself in what is now commonly called an 'intuitive' way (in response to physiological hunger), I discovered that other unsuccessful attitudes toward life struggles with similar language and inflexibility.

Resolutions that fail tend to fall into this framework: 

1. Vows and promises  
2. Huge and global goals                                                                     
3. Externally-related expectations 

Research indicates that changing the language we use to describe our life experiences changes our emotions and therefore our actions. I'd like to suggest a substantial, heartfelt effort to change the substance, not just the sound, of the resolution.

The Science of Positive Psychology 

Martin Seligman, founder of Positive Psychology, an international, research-based theory and practice, wrote LEARNED OPTIMISM in the early nineties, in which he drew from cognitive psychotherapy to encourage the practice of creating new pathways in our brains by changing the content of the language we each use to explain our life experiences. At the same time, neuroscience research began to share research that demonstrated the plasticity of the human brain. 


Reframing Your ‘Explanatory Style’ 

Underlying the research on positive emotions is a framework that identifies characteristics of 'pessimistic' and 'optimistic' language we use when "explaining" to ourselves our life experiences. Typical (or perhaps old-fashioned?) resolutions tend to use pessimistic 'explanatory style': 

1. Rigid/Stable (as in, unchanging): I will, I should, I promise...
2. Global: every day, always, forever, never...
3. External: planning for events out of your control 

These characteristics define pessimistic thinking. And pessimistic thinking creates gratuitous negative emotions, which tend to deplete energy, focus, mood, and more. When we fail at these unrealistic goals and resolutions, our language can include more of the same pessimistic thinking: 1. "I can't" (rigid/unchanging) 2. "I'll never be able to..." (never/always) 3. "I'm a failure" (personal vs. out of your control).

The Power of Changing Your Language 

Consider changing the way you describe your 'resolutions' or even 'goals'. Instead of using rigid, global, and external-related language, try this: 

1. 'Unstable'/Flexible language and expectations: I'm interested in, I'll try to____, I hope to, (but I give myself permission to adjust and/or change my plans.)  
2. 'Local'/Specific to a smaller, not global, framework: I'll schedule time for____and accept that I may not be always able to adhere to the schedule 
3. 'Internal'/originating from your interests, passions, longings, abilities—i.e., what you can control: I'd like to spend more time researching more precise matches for exactly what I write, and make sure my mss. are the absolute best they can be before submitting.




Most Do Better With Flexibility

Since it is our inability to meet unrealistic expectations that often sets negative thinking into motion, I found that building in a gentle, compassionate, and flexible attitude can lead to greater productivity than a harsher and rigid one.  

For the last several decades, this has made a huge difference by: 

1. finding quicker ways to climb over obstacles and turns in the road 
2. being more productive (which I view as persistent-to-completion of projects in which I'm interested) 
3. focusing on what is in my control and acceptance of those things beyond my control. 

Enabling the Events of a Creative Life 

Practicing, and ultimately integrating, a different way of thinking about my own explanatory style enabled me to have the life of a writer, one that began seriously in 1999, when I wrote my first children's story. Submitting became an exercise in hope, rather than a chore that could lead to more despair. Working hard in response to serious critique became a meaningful challenge to move my writing in each manuscript, each verse of a novel, to a clearer, more lyrical, more truly poetic level. (Notably, this ability also evolved into the capacity to distinguish between helpful critique and that which did not mesh with my own vision—previously, a terrifying choice, since in the early years I did not trust my own perceptions of my work). 

Is This Just Letting Ourselves ‘Off the Hook’? 

The brain's response to a change in language can be life-changing. But is it scary to give up the more rigid framework? Does it feel like you'll never accomplish anything if you're flexible with yourself, depend on checking in with your specific needs, hopes, longings, instead of what you believe you "should" be doing? If "making resolutions" is expected, will you really be less successful if you don't do that?

I enjoy having projects to work on, making lists of what I'd like to accomplish in any given day or week, and frequently have items that move to the next week, without any judgment. 

Work, not resolutions, challenges and energizes, encouraging repetition of focused, productive, and creative activity. Sometimes that doesn't work, particularly in our more challenging times. When I have an "off" day, I try to relax through it and return to work later, or the next day.

It is not the desire to accomplish and to plan that is problematic. Rather, rigid expectations set us up for failure and then stress, even anguish, caused by the too-global and too-huge framework. 

Flexibility is not equivalent to slacking off. Gentleness is not lack of discipline and hard work. Compassion is not failure.
 How to Begin, Differently

Any day of the year, we can relax the 'shoulds', and instead, wonder: 
  • What are my interests now?      
  • What am I capable of absolutely achieving today? (don't ever think there's something too tiny, because not the amount, but the something that encourages you) 
  • If I'm stuck on what I'd like to do, can I experiment with something different or new, and trust that it could be a bridge back to my original project?
I challenge myself on a regular basis to be a persistent, productive, joyful writer. 

I try my best each day—and that can look different depending on the day, my internal state, and the external state of my life. 

The result can be hard work, practicing and discovering, learning and experimenting. It won't make us Jedi, but it will help us become and live as the writers we want to be. 

Sorry, Yoda!

Do you have some thoughts or questions about this? Please feel free to email me through my website: https://carolcovengrannick.com

Thursday, December 10, 2020

Wintering

The Grog will be taking a break in December. We wish all our readers a restful, recuperative and regenerating season as we near the end of this most abnormal of years. We'll be back in January with more kid-lit celebrating posts.

Wednesday, November 25, 2020

Mary Quattlebaum: Author, Teacher, Book Reviewer—Plus Some of Her Favorite 2020 Books-- by Julie Phend

 

Mary Quattlebaum


Mary Quattlebaum is the author of 27 award-winning picture books, chapter books, novels, poetry, and nonfiction for children. Her most recent titles are Hero Dogs and Brother, Sister, Me and You. She teaches in the MFA program in writing for children and young adults at the Vermont College of Fine Arts, and at the Writer’s Center in Bethesda, MD.  She reviews children’s books regularly for Washington Post/KidsPost and Washington Parent and speaks frequently at schools and conferences.

 

I talked to Mary about her career in children’s literature. Here’s a peek into her busy life.

 

You’ve had a varied career in children’s literature, writing, teaching, and reviewing books for children. Is there one of those “jobs” you love most—or is it the variety that inspires you?

 

I really enjoy the variety of what I do: writing, teaching, reviewing, and speaking. I find that I glean insights from each that help me grow and improve in the others. I’m grateful to be part of a community filled with people who work hard to share beauty, playfulness, and emotional truth with children.

 

 

How did you get started in the field of children’s literature?


I hadn’t really thought about writing for children until I started working as a medical writer at Children’s National Medical Center in Washington, DC. I had just finished my M.A. in English, with a focus on the teaching of writing, and was starting to publish stories and poems in literary journals for adults. At Children’s, my good friend (and now husband) and I started a program called Magic Words. Each week, we met with a child in the hospital and helped them to express themselves through words, writing down the poems and stories they dictated. We strove to make the experience playful and creative—Chris always began by performing some magic. I enjoyed working with those kids so much that I started writing for children—learning, of course, that there were important differences between writing for youngsters and for adults.

 

What was your favorite book to write and why?


That is such a tough question! I loved writing all my books—for different reasons. My favorites:  Pirate vs. Pirate, because I was inspired by my husband’s request to write a pirate book, which I did as a playful piratical love story and dedicated to him. I loved visiting the country landscape of my childhood with the three Jo MacDonald narrative nonfiction picture books. They made me think about my dad, who so generously shared his knowledge of the natural world with his children and grandchildren. Mighty Mole and Super Soil holds a special place
in my heart because I am a huge fan of moles, who truly are the superheroes of the animal kingdom.  My most recent nonfiction picture book—Brother, Sister, Me and You—is about animal siblings and is dedicated to my six sisters and brothers. I loved researching and exploring the connections that animals have with their siblings.

 

As a teacher, what’s your top tip for writers of children’s books?

 


To read widely, all genres of children’s books, and try writing in all of them. Take creative risks, try new forms and topics, follow your curiosity! Beginning writers seem to grapple with one of two personal challenges: They rarely finish a given project but instead go on to the next new shiny idea—or they tend to polish and polish one manuscript, hoping it will sell. The students and writers I know who continue to develop and publish are able to balance these two tendencies. They recognize the importance of bringing a project to completion and stringently revising it, but they also know the value of moving beyond one project to grow by embracing new material and engaging with new elements of craft. 

 

As a reviewer, what qualities make a book for children stand out?

 

For me, what truly makes a book shine is quality of language. I’ve found that if a writer finesses sentences, attends to word choice, and plays with sound … s/he also tends to be diligent with character, plot, setting, and theme. I remember as a kid going back to re-read poems or passages just to savor the language. That’s how I discovered Elizabeth Bishop, in a big anthology of poetry for children. The images in her poem, “The Fish,” were so precise and amazing that—well, I was hooked as firmly as that eponymous creature.

 

Can you share a story from a child who’s been impacted by a book that you’ve written?

 

This happened after I had published only one or two books, and this boy’s comment has proved heartening over the years, as I, like all writers, deal with the ups and downs, disappointments and challenges of the business. During the Q&A at the end of a presentation, a fourth grader raised his hand and asked: “Who are your influences?” I had noticed this boy—quiet and very focused—during my talk and guessed he might be a writer, too. So I asked him: “And who are your influences?” He answered, rather shyly: “Now you are.” I was touched by his response and the thought that my book had connected like that with a reader.

 

And here’s my favorite funny comment: 


After a school presentation, I found a note written by a child on a table displaying my books. It read: “I thought this was going to be really boring but I was wrong!!!” Yes, there were at least three exclamation points and even a few hearts.

 

Finally, at this time of year, readers are looking for books to give as gifts for Christmas. Would you be willing to share some titles?

 

So many amazing books in 2020! Here are some of my top choices:

 

Picture books:  You Matter, a poetic celebration of the interconnection of life by Caldecott Honoree Christian Robinson.

 

Nonfiction: Condor Comeback by Sibert winner Sy Montgomery. 

 

 

Middle-grade Graphic Novel: Twins, a lively coming-of-age graphic novel by Varian Johnson and Shannon Wright.

 

 

Middle-grade novel: A Whale of the Wild, a compelling drama about the undersea world of orcas, by Rosanne Parry. 


YA:  Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You, a timely, informative book by two of America’s most important writers Jason Reynolds and Ibram X. Kendi.

 

Thank you, Mary, for sharing your insights!


For more 2020 book ideas, visit the Washington Post’s list of Best Books for Children at:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/kidspost/best-childrens-books-of-2020-reveal-a-growing-diversity/2020/11/16/bef29fce-0d63-11eb-8074-0e943a91bf08_story.html 



Visit Mary on the web at www.maryquattlebaum.com

Wednesday, November 18, 2020

TIMELY THANKSGIVING TITLES by Sherri Jones Rivers

      Fall is a wonderful, refreshing time of the year and especially the Thanksgiving season and all it means to friends and family. Lots of great children's books are out there that celebrate the season. I contacted the children's librarian, Heather McCue, in Columbia, SC, at the Richland County Library. They have a fabulous, up-to-date collection of kidlit books. She was gracious enough to send me a list of the more popular books in her downtown library. She broke them down into three categories--Families and Food, Gratitude, and Thanksgiving. I decided to pick two from each group. You may have your own favorites, but maybe you will add some of these to your list.


                                                              FAMILIES AND FOOD


All for Pie, Pie for all by David Martin.

This  is a cute book with whimsical illustrations that are detailed and denote a warm and cozy feeling. An especially good book for preschoolers that features animals--cats, mice, and ants. Each group feasts on the Thanksgiving pie leftovers, with the ants finishing the last crumbs. I could see children joining in on the repeated phrases--Little brother ate a piece, big sister ate a piece, momma cat ate a piece, poppa cat ate a piece and Grandma cat ate a piece. Once the pie is gone, hunger sets in and with a joint effort from the cats, the mice and the ants, a fresh pie is produced--this time it's blueberry.





Grandma's Tiny House by Janay Brown Wood 

This is a sweet story I think children can relate to. Even
though social distancing seems to be in order for now, they can remember times of big family get-togethers and
can look forward to more in the future. The cast of diverse characters gives children their place in the book. The rhyme draws you in and it's nice to have a counting book that goes past the number ten. There is always something new in the illustrations that the reader may not have noticed before. The young reader will be excited to see that a child has the solution for the too-full house.






                                                                      GRATITUDE



We Are Grateful: Otsaliheliga by Traci Sorrell.

This book rings true because Traci's mom was a part of the Cherokee nation, and Traci herself lives within that nation. The book starts with fall, since that represents the Cherokee New Year, and goes through each season with bright and colorful illustrations of everyday things that are celebrated. This book is good for all ages and introduces Cherokee culture in a charming and relatable way. For added interest, the illustrator decided to put a pileated woodpecker in each spread so the reader would have something to look forward to.




Gracias Thanks by Pat Moira 

A young Mexican/Caucasian boy shares everyday things to be grateful for. The acrylic illustrations by John Parra are full of fun details that pop with color and vibrancy. From the moment he wakes up to the bright sunshine's warmth until he goes to bed to the sound of chirping crickets, he gives thanks for the things and people in his life. The poetic writing on each page gives us the Spanish version of what's being said. (I got to practice my Spanish) This bilingual book would be a great read-aloud for classroom story time. The author's endnote challenges the reader to make a list of what he's thankful for.


                                                                    THANKSGIVING


One is a Feast for Mouse by Judy Cox.

What a fun book with lively and engaging illustrations. Mouse peeps out of his hidey hole and spies the leftovers of a big Thanksgiving feast. One green pea catches his eye and seems to be the perfect feast for one little mouse. Or is it? Reading the online reviews, I especially liked one idea of a home-schooling mom who concocted a sequencing activity. She traced the  mouse and drew a picture of each food that he adds to his stack. The kids colored and cut out the mouse, along with the foods. Then, she had them recall the foods added and glue each item  in order, just like in the book. Maybe some other families would like to try this idea.





I Know an Old Woman who Swallowed a Pie by Alison Jackson 

Lots of versions of the "Old Lady" stories exist, but this one is perfectly suited for a Thanksgiving read. Things that might show up on the readers' table are mentioned here--pie, turkey, squash, salad, rolls, etc. The illustrations are whimsical and chaotically fun, getting more and more ridiculous. The ending is clever as she is finally big enough to be a float in the Macy's Thanksgiving Day parade. In a review, one mother said she made a cardboard cut-out of the old lady, cut out a stomach, and let the kids draw and color their favorite foods to "feed" her with. Cute idea for a theme-related activity.




Some other books you might want to add to your list are Fry Bread: A Native American Family Story by Kevin Noble Maillard, Before We Eat: From Farm to Table by Pat Brisson, and Sharing the Bread: An Old-Fashioned Thanksgiving Story by Pat Zietlow Miller. Happy Thanksgiving, one and all!



Wednesday, November 11, 2020

The Craft of Revision with Author Hope Lim

Welcome to the GROG Blog, Hope Lim! It’s always a pleasure to showcase the work of picture book authors and to learn more about the craft of writing for children. 


Let’s begin with Hope’s debut book: 

I AM A BIRD

Written by Hope Lim

Illustrated by Hyewon Yum

Candlewick, February 2, 2021

 

To help our GROG Blog followers learn more about you, Hope, please share five facts.

 

1. The ideas for my stories are drawn from real-life experiences.

2. I’m originally from South Korea.

3. I have many notebooks filled with my favorite poems and my own drawings from my childhood. 

4. I like to have espresso with sparkling water. 

5. I run almost every day and use it as time to reflect. 


Share the inspiration behind your debut book I AM A BIRD.

 

The idea for I AM A BIRD started after an encounter with a stranger in Golden Gate Park. I thought she was strange at first, but I immediately recognized my perception was unfair and started to reflect on our innate fears and biases toward each other. When I came home, my husband told me about how my daughter made joyful birdcalls on their way to school on the back of his bike. I was struck by the contrast between my daughter and my simultaneous experiences. At that moment, I knew I had to write a story about exploring the fear of the unknown and combined it my daughter’s soaring spirit. That’s how I AM A BIRD was born - a story of celebrating kindred spirits discovered unexpectedly all told from a child’s perspective. 

List three words to encapsulate the spirit of I AM BIRD.

1. kindred spirit

2. friendship

3. empathy 

 

To become effective and proficient writers, students in my classes follow five-steps to write a polished/published piece of writing. Students learn skills and strategies and gain confidence through practice and revision. This third step of revision needs dedicated time to write and rewrite, redo, reconfigure, and reconsider.

Writers of children’s literature understand the importance of revision, too. Writing manuscripts requires numerous revisions and edits and countless hours prior to publication. 

Hope understands the importance of revision. She shares meaningful tips for the craft of revision and the process she uses to work from a draft to revision as she polishes her manuscripts preparing them for publication.

 

Everyone has a different revision process and technique. For me, the revision stage begins when I share my story with critique partners. They all offer different suggestions and I read them and try to see their suggestions from their perspective. 

 

The revision process needs time, patience and a lot of re-imagination. As a writer, self-editing skills can be very helpful. Self-editing begins when I have a complete draft, no matter how rough it is. I keep rewriting until the draft loses its roughness and generates ideas for a new structure, character, or ending. After going through multiple re-writes, I stop when I feel it’s close enough to share with my critique partners. I wait at least a few days to make sure it’s ready before I solicit opinions from my CPs. I find the feedback on a polished manuscript helpful. 


With early drafts, I often receive conflicting ideas on undeveloped areas, whereas polished ones tend to get similar feedback on an outstanding issue. When I receive the comments, I let them sit for a few days before applying them. I may share the revised version with them again or share it with my agent. My approach to revisions with my agent or an editor is similar. I try to look at my story from their perspectives based on their comments and start to revise only when I understand the direction they suggest.


Thank you, Hope, for sharing your thoughts and perspective about the craft of revision and how you make your stories better through time and rewriting.

 

These two spreads share the just right words, including onomatopoeia, that Hope created after numerous revisions. The bright and colorful illustrations by Hyewon Yon compliment the story line.


Just a few more wonderings . . . Tell us about five objects that sit on your writing desk. Perhaps some are functional and others provide inspiration.


1. A journal 

2. Essential Tales and Poems of Edgar Allan Poe

3. Piles of picture books and New Yorker Magazines

4. AirPods

5. A glass of water and a cup of coffee


Please share a favorite literary quote.

 

What is essential is invisible to the eye.” — The Little Prince


What stories are you currently hard at work writing and creating? What books should we look for in the near future?

 

I am currently working on several stories, some new and some old. I’m trying to find a new way to transform my old stories while slowly putting time into new ones. MY TREE by Neal Porter Books will be out in May 2021, and MOMMY’S HOMETOWN by Candlewick will be out in fall 2022. 


Congratulations, Hope, on your debut book, I AM A BIRD, and two more books to follow! Thank you for sharing your success and a craft of revision tip on the GROG Blog today. Wishing you all the best as you continue to read, write, revise, edit, polish, and repeat.


Hope Lim is a children’s book author from South Korea and currently lives in San Francisco. Her debut book, I AM A BIRD, is to be released by Candlewick on February 2, 2021. Her debut will be followed by MY TREE, Neal Porter Books/Holiday House in May 2021 and MOMMY’S HOMETOWN, Candlewick, in Fall 2022. You can find Hope on Instagram @hopelim_sf, Twitter @hope_lim or hopelim.com.

Wednesday, November 4, 2020

Jazzing Up Your Writing with ONOMATOPOEIA! Plus a Bonus WORD LIST By Eileen R. Meyer


POP!

BOOM! 

WHAM!



 

What exactly is Onomatopoeia?


     Besides being a word that we all have trouble spelling correctly, Merriam-Webster defines onomatopoeia as “the naming of a thing of action by a vocal imitation of the sound associated with it (such as buzz or hiss).” Simply put, onomatopoeia words are sound words. Clap, growl, jangle, vroom—all of these choices have distinctive sounds and are examples of onomatopoeia.

 

Why use Onomatopoeia?


     Using effective sound words in your writing—such as clang or achoo—will certainly help you come up with the most creative way to convey what is happening in a scene. Importantly, it also enhances the sensory experience for the reader. And it’s FUN!

You’ll also find that your sentences can be trimmed of unnecessary words—one onomatopoeia word choice usually replaces a much lengthier description. If you are writing children’s picture books where the economy of words is especially important, utilizing sound words will help you keep your word count low. Consider these examples:


“She made a low, mournful sound as if she were in pain” or She groaned

“He ejected gas spasmodically and noisily from his stomach through his mouth” or He belched


You get the picture. Onomatopoeia allows you to be concise. Additionally, sound words inject an element of humor and playfulness into your piece.

  

Children’s Books that showcase Onomatopoeia:

 

There are oodles of children’s picture books that effectively employ onomatopoeia. Here are a few of my favorites:

 


A Mouthful of Onomatopoeia, by Bette Blaisdell

Bear Snores On, by Karma Wilson

Boom Boom, by Sarvinder Naberhaus

“Buzz,” said the Bee, by Wendy Lewison

Click, Clack, Moo, Cows that Type, by Doreen Cronin

Hush!: a Thai Lullaby, by Minfong Ho

Muncha! Muncha! Muncha!, by Candace Fleming

Roller Coaster, by Marla Frazee

Split! Splat!, by Amy Gibson

Squeak! Rumble! Whomp! Whomp! Whomp!: A Sonic Adventure, by Wynton Marsalis

The Little Old Lady Who Was Not Afraid of Anything, by Linda Williams

Watersong, by Tim McCanna

We’re Going on a Bear Hunt, by Michael Rosen

Who Likes Rain?, by Wong Herbert Yee

Whoosh, Crunch, Roar: Football Onomatopoeia, by Mark Weakland

Zin! Zin! Zin!: A Violin, by Lloyd Moss

  

A Handy-Dandy Onomatopoeia Word List


             Writers love tools that save them time—at least, I know I do.  I recently began working on a picture book project where I wanted to associate a key sound with each of my anthropomorphic characters. I searched on the internet for an expansive list of sound words.  I found a few pretty good listings, but I couldn’t find ONE complete list that included the entire universe (or close to it) of great onomatopoeia words. So I took one for the team and gave up an afternoon to put all those lists into one comprehensive onomatopoeia word list. And POW!— I’m sharing it with YOU, our devoted GROG Blog Readers so that you may take advantage of it, too.

 

Find my list on this page on my website:  

https://www.eileenmeyerbooks.com/extras/

 

Note: I’m sure that YOU, our whip-smart blog readers may know some onomatopoeia words that I missed. If so, comment with additional words on this GROG post and I’ll add them to this handy listing. In a few weeks, I’ll reshare the document. Happy writing!


AND the winner of the picture book, SMELLY KELLY, by Beth Anderson is Angie Quantrell. Congratulations!