Thursday, June 8, 2017

CHARGE YOUR WRITING SUPERPOWERS WHILE YOU SLEEP!



By Janie Reinart

Do you want to increase your writing superpowers  while you sleep? 

We've all had the experience of going to sleep thinking about our writing and waking up--in the morning or the middle of the night--with just the right word or plot twist. 

Quick write it down so you don't forget! No matter how hard I try, I can't remember in the morning.

This new routine is a twist on morning pages,
called crystallized thinking.

 
This ten minute routine, is a fun way to jump start your creativity. The awesome sauce for your writing superpowers (your subconscious-awake 24/7) is to not only practice writing in the AM, but to prompt your subconscious with questions in the PM!

Before you go to sleep, direct your subconscious by journaling as many questions as you can about the writing project you are working on. 


“Never go to sleep without 
a request to your subconscious.”
— Thomas Edison


In the morning, before you look at emails or Facebook, or read the paper, empty your mind by writing down what ever flows from your pen.

I've added my own spin to the exercise by using different color pens for the AM and PM journaling.

My subconscious has given me some good answers and some I wasn't expecting.



One night, I wrote question after question about a nonfiction story set in World War II. Earlier that same day, I spoke to my three year old granddaughter.  

She wanted a snack. When she and her dad went to the pantry, Jane said,"Options, please."

The next morning, I started to journal excited to see what answers would appear for my World War II project. 

I was very surprised when Evelyn Armadillo showed up.
She couldn't make up her mind and said, "Options, please."

You never know where your superpowers will lead you.
Try crystallized thinking and see where you go. The more you practice, the more results appear.



27 comments:

  1. Oh, you have me intrigued about Evelyn Armadillo! I have not heard of this practice. Gonna try it this weekend. TY, Janie.

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    1. Kathy it is so much fun.๐Ÿ˜Š

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  2. Good strategy. I'll have to try it. I did go to bed last night thinking about the plot of my story, but my dream had nothing to do with my story :(

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    1. Tina, write it down an maybe iti will have something to do w/it.

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    2. Oh no, Tina. I agree with Kathy๐Ÿ˜Š Try and write it down. Good luck.

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  3. Great ideas here, Janie. I can't wait to get started on this practice!

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    1. Chris let us know what happens ๐Ÿ˜Š

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  4. I think I'll give this a try. I can see this working for me.

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    1. Great! The more I practice, the better it works. Let us know what happens ๐Ÿ˜Š

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  5. What a refreshing way to look at our writing activities. A good jump starter for ideas and perhaps new writing trails to follow. Hope some folks follow up with how this worked for them. Thanks, Janie.

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    1. Sherri, I agree. Will be fun to see what happens ๐Ÿ˜Š

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  6. I've had to stop working on my own writing, especially difficult points of a ms, in the evening because it tortures me all night and makes it really hard to sleep. I must be doing something wrong.

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    1. Maybe writing it down will rest your mind?

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  7. Love that "options please" :) I will try this method and see if I can break down those subconscious barriers.

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    1. Charlotte let us know what happens๐Ÿ˜Š

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  8. Great suggestions, Janie! Wonderful ways to jump start your morning and those stories waiting to take form.

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  9. Thanks for writing about this, Janie! I've been wanting to start this kind of practice, but I usually jump out of bed and head into the day, including taking my son to camp/school. I had heard that it's important to do the morning journal just after you wake up, before you let other parts of your day filter into your consciousness. From your description, it sounds like I could wait until I actually sit down to write to process the night's "discoveries." Have you found this to be the case? Or do you do this immediately upon waking?

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    1. I try and write before things get too crazy-so soon after waking, before I start thinking too much๐Ÿ˜Š Maybe weekends would work?

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  10. Great post, Janie! I definitely want to try this. Thanks for posting!

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    1. You are welcome! Have fun๐Ÿ˜Š

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  11. Oh such a good post, with great strategy. Really a great way to take control of my writing life.

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  12. So glad you liked the post. Give it a whirl and let us know what happens or who shows up๐Ÿ˜Š

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  13. I love this idea, Janie! I use the notes feature on my phone and often wake up with ideas, but this exercise seems like it would yield more interesting results. Thanks!

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    1. Randi I am having fun with it๐Ÿ˜Š

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  14. Thanks for sharing this great idea, Janie. I have used this technique for encouraging vivid dreaming, but I have never tried applying it to my writing. Can't wait to give it a try!

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    1. Excited to see what happens ๐Ÿ˜Š

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